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Vascular Access Devices Part 2: Potential Complications

presented by Lisa Gorski

Accreditation Check:

Although the overall safety of home infusion therapy has been established over the past 30-some years, infusion therapy is still a high risk area of practice for patients who require an invasive device such as a peripheral or central vascular access device. In this course, potential complications will be explored including signs and symptoms, preventative interventions, and management.

Meet Your Instructor

  • Lisa Gorski, RN, MS, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN

    Lisa Gorski MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN, has worked for over 30 years as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) for Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice, now part of Ascension at Home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. As a CNS, she has developed and oversees the home infusion therapy program, provides staff education, is involved in agency quality assessment, performance improvement, infection control and surveillance, and also provides direct patient care. Lisa received both her bachelor’s and master’s degree from the University of Milwaukee, Wisconsin College of Nursing. Her graduate school work focused on the chronically ill patient population. Within her home care agency, she has also focused extensively on preventing hospitalizations, including a focus on the heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient populations. Lisa served on the American Nurses Association committee and helped develop the American Nurses Association Home Health Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, most recently published in 2015. Lisa is the author of over 50 book chapters and journal articles on home care and infusion therapy topics. She is also the author of several books, including the 7th edition of the Manual of IV Therapeutics: Evidence-Based Practice for Infusion Therapy (2018) and the 2017 book: Fast Facts for Nurses About Home Infusion Therapy. Lisa has been actively involved with the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) for many years. She served as the 2007-2008 INS President, is the 2017-2019 Chairperson of the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, is the chair of the INS Standards of Practice Committee, and led the INS Vesicant Task Force. She is an editor for INS 2010 textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach and also for the forthcoming 2019 edition, which is in progress. In 2006, Lisa was inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing. She was named the 2003 CRNI of the Year by INS and the 2011 CNS of the Year by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists. She speaks nationally and internationally on standards development, infusion therapy/vascular access, and home health care. Over the past few years, Lisa has presented well-received presentations addressing standards of practice relative to care of vascular access devices and infusion administration in the US, China, Europe, and Middle Eastern and Latin American countries.

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

Download Learning Objectives
  1. Peripheral Catheter Related Complications

    1. Peripheral Catheter Related Complications

    The nurse who cares for a patient with a short peripheral or midline catheter must recognize potential complications such as phlebitis, infiltration/extravasation, infection, and nerve damage. Complications will be explored in the context of case examples, with an emphasis on preventative strategies and actions to take in the event of their occurrence.

  2. Central Vascular Access Device Complications:  Blood Stream Infection, CVAD Occlusion, and CVAD Malposition

    2. Central Vascular Access Device Complications: Blood Stream Infection, CVAD Occlusion, and CVAD Malposition

    The nurse who cares for patients with CVADs must recognize potential complications. In this chapter, bloodstream infection, CVAD occlusion, and CVAD malposition are addressed. Complications will be explored in the context of case examples, with an emphasis on preventative strategies and actions to take in the event of their occurrence.

  3. Central Vascular Access Device Complications: Catheter-Associated Venous Thrombosis, Air Embolism, and Catheter Damage

    3. Central Vascular Access Device Complications: Catheter-Associated Venous Thrombosis, Air Embolism, and Catheter Damage

    Continuing the discussion of complications after chapter 2, catheter-associated venous thrombosis, air embolism, and catheter damage are presented.

  4. Patient Education

    4. Patient Education

    While the overall risk for complications among home care patients with VADs is relatively low, patients and families must be instructed in and able to identify, act upon signs/symptoms, and promptly report any issues. Effective patient-teaching strategies will be addressed.