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Developing the IEP as a School-Based PT

presented by Mary Jane Rapport & Amy Barr

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Learning to develop an IEP that accurately reflects the student’s functional performance and identifies the needed accommodations and services is a specialized skill. This course will define and discuss the various components of the IEP. The relationships between the IEP process and the patient/client management model in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice will be described. Various methods for developing and measuring meaningful IEP goals will be explained and illustrated through case examples. Concepts such as collaboration, parental consent, and predetermination as relating to IEP meetings will be explored.

Meet Your Instructors

  • Mary Jane Rapport, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA

    Mary Jane Rapport, PT, DPT, PhD is a Catherine Worthingham Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). Dr. Rapport is a professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Department of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at the University of Colorado, where she is on the faculty of the Physical Therapy Program. She is the Director of the University of Colorado Pediatric Physical Therapy Residency Program, the PT Program Student Services Coordinator, the PT Discipline Director for the Maternal Child Health LEND program through JFK Partners, and the Co-Director of the Teaching Scholars Program in the School of Medicine. Dr. Rapport has extensive experience as an educator and a pediatric physical therapist with a productive record of presentations and publications. Much of her career has been focused on legislative action, policy interpretation for the delivery of special education, related services, and early intervention services. Dr. Rapport has been a physical therapist for over 30 years and a physical therapist educator for over 10 years. While much of her career has been in academia and focused on higher education, she has maintained clinical practice in schools as a school-based physical therapist and as an early intervention service provider. Most recently, she has been working one day a week with students with disabilities at the preschool, elementary, and high schools levels in a local school district. She has taught courses and workshops and delivered conference sessions specifically on the implementation of services under IDEA and related federal laws to thousands of pediatric physical therapists over the years.

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  • Amy Barr, PT, DPT

    Amy Barr, PT, DPT is a practicing school-based therapist and the Physical Therapy Coordinator for a large school district located in the suburban Denver area. She has 20 years of experience working with adults and children and has spent the last 14 years serving preschool through transition age students in a school setting. Dr. Barr teaches nationally on topics important to school-based therapy, including team collaboration, IEP development, and physical therapist performance appraisal. She has a passion for providing quality continuing education for school-based physical therapists and cofounded an annual education day for therapists in Colorado. Dr. Barr chaired the Physical Therapist Performance Appraisal Task Force for the School-Based Special Interest Group of the Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy. She participated in the PT Performance Appraisal work group for the Colorado Educator Effectiveness Project and is an active member of the Colorado Department of Education Physical Therapy Advisory Committee. Dr. Barr graduated from the University of Colorado with her Masters of Science in Physical Therapy in 1997 and her Doctor of Physical Therapy in 2010. She is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association and the Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy.

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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  1. IEP Document and Process

    1. IEP Document and Process

    This chapter describes the Client Management Model in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice and the required components of the IEP most relevant to related service providers. Two case studies are used to further elucidate the IEP components. IEP software program benefits and cautions are briefly reviewed.

  2. Developing IEP Goals

    2. Developing IEP Goals

    This chapter discusses important factors to consider when developing IEP goals, such as discipline-free goals and SMART goals. It links goal development to the broader IEP through clinical reasoning and identifies three ways to construct goals, using the case studies introduced in Chapter 1, that are consistent with these principles.

  3. The IEP Meeting

    3. The IEP Meeting

    This chapter describes the importance of the collaborative process in developing the IEP document within the IEP meeting. The guidelines surrounding IEP meetings—including frequency, attendance, meeting excusals, and parent consent—are outlined.